744px-Flag_of_Nevada Marijuana.jpg
Graphic: Reality Catcher
It may be time to enter Nevada in the “Which state will legalize pot first?” betting.

​Following ballot initiatives to tax and regulate marijuana in Nevada in 2002 and 2006, the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) of Nevada is preparing for the next step in its fight to make marijuana legal in the Silver State.

On Wednesday, Dec. 9, MPP-NV will make an announcement at a press conference in front of the Clark County Government Center at 11 a.m. While specific details of the plan will not be revealed until then, Dave Schwartz, manager of the group, hinted that a ballot measure to tax and regulate may be in the works.

405px-Medical_cannabis_demo_2.JPG.jpeg
Photo: Damon D’Amato, WAMC
Medical marijuana supporters march on L.A. City Hall in 2007

​Medical marijuana advocacy organization Americans for Safe Access (ASA) will hold a press conference in front of Los Angeles City Hall at 9:45 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 8, in advance of the expected vote on regulating dispensaries in L.A.

The City Council has indicated they might meet in closed session to make final deliberations on an ordinance that would regulate how and where medical marijuana dispensaries can operate in the city.
According to the agenda for Tuesday’s council meeting, the possible closed session is due to “threats of litigation publicly made regarding the adoption of the proposed ordinance. Last month, ASA had threatened to sue the city if it banned the “sale” of medical marijuana.
Tuesday’s meeting will likely be the culmination of a two-year struggle between pro- and anti-medical marijuana forces for dominance in the City of Angels, where City Attorney Carmen Trutanich and like-minded Los Angeles District Attorney Steve Cooley have grabbed headlines by making inflammatory statements like “approximately zero” of the dispensaries in the county are operating legally.

Hanf.jpg
Photo: Hendrike
The color of money.

​A town planning committee in Michigan on Tuesday will present a plan to officials that would amend the city’s zoning ordinance to treat medical marijuana growers as businesses, forcing dispensaries to operate from general business districts rather than homes, reports Jonathan Oosting of MLive.com.

The scheme, from the Royal Oak Plan Commission, would allow dispensaries in general business districts as a special land use, according to Catherine Kavanaugh at The Macomb Daily.
In Royal Oak, these districts are on Woodward Avenue, Main Street north of downtown, and some parts of Coolidge Highway and 14 Mile Road.
Dispensaries would be banned within 1,000 feet of schools, libraries, parks, playgrounds, day cares, places of worship, or other dispensaries. Hours of operation would be limited to 8 a.m. until 8 p.m.

Screen shot 2009-12-07 at 9.31.56 AM.png
KUNC

​A commentator on Denver public radio has called the War on Drugs a failure, and has endorsed the legalization of marijuana.

“As a nation we have been waging a war of attrition against ourselves in which the winner is none other than narco-traffickers south of the border,” said KUNC commentator Dr. Pius Kamau. “We have fought a valiant but losing war on drugs.”
“We must be cognizant of the fact that the cost of incarcerating 2 million Americans for drug offenses is bankrupting this nation,” Dr. Kamau said. “And experience has shown that the best way to deal with those addicted to drugs is not prison. It is therapy.”

21681840_640X480.jpg
10News.com
Dispensary manager Jovan Jackson faces sentencing today for ecstasy and Xanax.

​The manager of a San Diego medical marijuana dispensary will be sentenced today for illegal possession of prescription drug Xanax and the street drug Ecstasy.

Although 31-year-old Jovan Jackson was acquitted of marijuana possession and sale, he still possibly faces more than three years in prison because of the Xanax and ecstasy. However, he’ll probably only get probation, said Deputy District Attorney Chris Lindberg, according to San Diego’s 10News.com.
Jackson’s case was the first to go to trial after law enforcement raids in September resulted in 31 arrests and 14 medical marijuana collectives being shut down in San Diego. His arrest had an earlier genesis, though, resulting from raids last year at Answerdam Alternative Care Collective in Kearny Mesa.

Fremont_Solstice_Parade_2008_-_American_joint_01.jpg
Photo: Joe Mabel
A massive representation of a joint in a “rolling paper” evoking the American flag, 2008 Summer Solstice Parade, Fremont Fair, Seattle, WA.

​Marijuana decriminalization in Washington state just won some important allies.

This morning, the Washington State Bar Association (WSBA) Board of Governors (BOG) voted to support the decrim bill, SB 5615, in the upcoming session of the Legislature.
The BOG voted 9 in favor, 0 opposed, and 2 abstaining to support the bill, Alison Holcomb, drug policy director at the ACLU of Washington, has told Toke of the Town.

800px-HMP_Verne.jpg
Photo: Bennelliott
Verne Prison on the Isle of Portland, henceforth forever known as “that prison that lets prisoners grow weed.”

​British prison guards unwittingly allowed a convicted drug dealer to grow marijuana in his cell — and even decorate one four-foot plant as a Christmas tree.

Mohamed Jalloh, 28, must be very persuasive. He convinced jail staff for at least five months that his fast-growing cannabis crop was only tomato plants, according to reporter Brian Flynn in The Sun newspaper.
(Please God, give me guards that trusting if I’m ever locked up again.)
Jalloh, who’s serving eight years on a drug charge, got so cocky, he put festive seasonal decorations on one of the plants “to brighten his cell” at Verne Prison on the Isle of Portland, Dorset, U.K.
Eventually he was ratted out by an envious inmate. Guards then identified the plants using Google image search, according to The Sun. (There you have it: There are actually still people in existence who don’t know what marijuana looks like. Prison guards, at that!)
“You could see the plants from the grounds as his cell looks on to the education department and communal outside area,” a source told The Sun. “They were on show for the world to see.”

800px-Oregano-spice.jpg
Photo: Henna
Careful flashing that oregano around just anywhere.

​A Clarksville, Tenn., man faces charges after being indicted on allegations he robbed a girl at gunpoint for what turned out to be what must have been some very nice-looking oregano.

Victor L. Little was arrested Dec. 3 from circuit court on an aggravated assault charge. His bond was set at $15,000, reports Tavia D. Green of the Clarksville Leaf-Chronicle. (No, I’m not making that newspaper name up.)
According to the indictment, Little, 18, along with Keith A. Jackson, 18, and Timothy E. Ogburn, 19, are charged with aggravated robbery and assault.
On Sept. 10, the men and a juvenile allegedly robbed two females at gunpoint, thinking they had a bag of marijuana in their possession.
It turned out to be oregano used as a prop in a school project.

Photo: Aaron Thackeray, Westword
Herbal Connections dispensary, located at 2209 W. 32nd Avenue in Denver, offers a variety of strains including Pineapple Kush.

​​Colorado’s medical marijuana community got a bit of editorial support today from a very influential source — leading newspaper The Denver Post.

In an Dec. 5 Op-Ed piece with the headline “Cities shouldn’t ban dispensaries,” the Post comes down firmly on the side of supporting the will of the Rocky Mountain State’s people as expressed in the 2000 voter initiative which legalized medical pot.
“Far too many muncipalities — including Greeley, Castle Rock, Colorado Springs and Broomfield — are just outright banning the dispensaries, citing the fact that the sale of marijuana is still illegal under federal law,” the Post editorial said.
“We think cities have a role in regulating businesses in a manner that reflects local needs and values,” the Post said, “but some seem to have reacted in haste or simply hope to pass the regulatory buck to other authorities.”
“It is wrong for cities to issue blanket bans,” the Post said. “The Colorado Constitution grants residents with debilitating medical conditions the right to acquire and possess medical marijuana.”
1 719 720 721 722 723 726