1218pot3.jpg
Photo: Louisiana State Police
Sea of green: Troopers say they discovered between 1,000 and 1,500 plants

​Police say they’ve arrested a 37-year-old man after finding between 1,000 and 1,500 marijuana plants growing in a trailer next to his home in Ponchatoula, La.

State Police Trooper Nick Manale told WWLTV the plants found in the “elaborate growing operation” had an “estimated value of about $1.8 million.”
Cannabis was discovered growing in the trailer, home, and garage of Jack Methvin.
The operation to find the plants started after the State Police Narcotics division got a tip that Methvin was growing pot, according to Manale.

g276258082d7c997e7fd6482bc52e275b27773ecbadc8b7.jpg
Photo: Huntington, W.Va. Police Department
This is what the cops described as a “sophisticated marijuana factory.” Guess they don’t get out much.

​A former voice for a drug-free workplace pleaded guilty Friday to “trafficking medical grade marijuana,” reports Curtis Johnson at the Huntington Herald-Dispatch.

Wendall Searls, 56, admitted in court Friday that he grew “medical grade” marijuana for himself, family and friends.
Huntington, W.Va., police called the grow operation a “marijuana factory” when they raided the house in September. They said they found more than 100 cannabis plants in a sophisticated indoor facility. Police said they believed Searls owned the grow house, but lived with his fiancée in Putnam County.

lilwayne.jpg
gurn.files.wordpress.com
Lil Wayne: Busted again, and already headed to prison in February

​Rapper Lil Wayne was detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Texas today after drug dogs detected marijuana on two of his tour buses, reports Aspen Steib of CNN.

The famed rapper, whose real name is DeWayne Michael Carter, Jr., was among 12 people being detained from the Lil Wayne entourage, according to Agent Joe Trevino.
Trevino told CNN the tour buses were on their way to Laredo, Texas, after playing a gig in Hidalgo, Mexico.

Stop Beating Marijuana Patients.jpg
Artwork: Jim Wheeler
Safe access to marijuana remains a distant dream to many patients — even in states which have legalized medical use

​One by one, the lights are winking out. In city after city, town after town, in states where medical marijuana is now legal, patients who had dared hope they would at last have safe access to the medicine recommended by their doctors are having those hopes dashed.
The problem? Political cowardice and the panicked reaction of the status quo.
Every week brings more news of freaked out city councils and county boards of supervisors who desperately want to appear to be “doing something” — anything — about the proliferation of marijuana dispensaries.
This phenomenon is so far mostly confined to California and to a lesser extent Colorado, but it’s unfortunately also starting to happen in Michigan, Montana and even Maine — where voters specifically approved dispensaries in November.
Rather than showing true leadership by showing genuine concern for patients and communities, too many local government officials are going for the easy, knee-jerk reaction. The level of disregard for the intentions of the voters — who clearly expressed their will by legalizing medical marijuana — is breathtaking.

Screen shot 2009-12-18 at 1.12.39 PM.png
MediLeaf
The little dispensary that could: MediLeaf is still open, despite the efforts of the Gilroy, Calif., City Council

​​A Superior Court judge handed down a ruling Tuesday keeping Gilroy, California’s new medical marijuana dispensary open for now, prompting a city councilman to call for a refund from the city’s legal firm.

MediLeaf owners embraced and sighed with relief in San Jose when Judge Kevin Murphy denied the City of Gilroy’s legal request for an injunction to shut the dispensary down immediately until after a trial ended, reports Jonathan Partridge of the Gilroy Dispatch.
The dispensary could open remain for a year or longer as the case winds its way through the labyrinthine legal process.
If that sounds expensive for the city, yes, it is. Councilman Craig Gartman said this week the he’d heard litigation could cost the city at least $250,000, and maybe up to half a million dollars.

greenrxprotest.jpg
Photo: stopthedrugwar.org
San Diegans protest Operation Green Rx, District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis’ dispensary crackdown

​The San Diego City Council is considering adopting dispensary regulations that were developed recently by the city’s Medical Marijuana Task Force, with substantial public input.

The task force held public meetings, studied ordinances from other cities and counties around the state, and considered comments from San Diego residents over a period of five weeks before making the recommendations.
“The San Diego City Council is doing a difficult and brave thing,” said Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, deputy state director in Southern California for the Drug Policy Alliance Network. “It’s putting safe access for medical marijuana patients and the needs of San Diegans above the political opposition of the County Board of Supervisors and the District Attorney.”


200802snoop.jpg
Photo: gothamist.com
Snoop Dogg: “Buy my medicine, buy my medicine…” Fo’ shizzle.

​​When rap music icon and stoner legend Snoop Dogg visits and you cook a batch of brownies, there are going to be pot jokes.

But things got even better than that when Snoop visited Martha Stewart’s show.
Snoop Dogg: “Trying to make some brownies, but we’re missing the most important part of the brownies.”
Stewart: “You want green brownies… brownish green brownies.”
Snoop: “The greener, the better!”
Stewart: “The greener, the better!”
Then, together, they break into an awkward, impromptu rap.
Priceless!
Is it just me, or is Martha a lot more “street” than she was before she did time?

bicycle-carry-huge-weight.jpg
Photo: www.funatiq.com
Here’s busted but unrepentant cyclist David Mock carrying around hundreds of pounds of pot behind his bike. (Just kidding.)

​The absurd charade around marijuana in professional athletics of assumed evil and feigned penitence continues with the saga of cyclist David Mock, marijuana user.

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA, yes, there really is such a thing, folks, and they take themselves quite seriously) said today that Mock, 32, accepted a three-month suspension, reports the Associated Press.
His offense? An agency-administered urine test showed positive for a metabolite of cannabis.
The Anti-Dopers say Mock actually got off light. His period of ineligibility started Dec. 11, but was reduced from three months to “time served” (only six days?!) after he completed the agency’s “anti-doping educational program” (those must be really great).
The agency said Mock’s urine from Aug. 15 at the Yankee Clipper race tested positive.

Photo: www.freedomsphoenix.com
Calm down, Chief. It’s just pot.

​Port Orchard, Wash., Police Chief Al Townsend is against legalizing pot, and he’s called a new bill to legalize marijuana in the state “ludicrous.”

“If the goal of the bill is to legalize marijuana for the purpose of generating tax revenue, that’s ridiculous,” Townsend wrote in an email to Kitsap Sun crime reporter Josh Farley.
Chief Townsend calls into question the judgment of his fellow Kitsap Countian, Rep. Sherry Appleton (D-Poulsbo), one of the co-sponsors of HB 2401, which would legalize marijuana for persons 21 and older.

wilson_151260895294.jpg
Photo: CMMNJ

​Jurors have found a Somerset County, N.J., medical marijuana patient not guilty of the most serious charge against him — operating a drug facility out of his home — reports Jennifer Golson of The Star-Ledger.

John Ray Wilson, 37, was growing 17 marijuana plants, which he said he used to treat his multiple sclerosis.
Wilson was found guilty of second-degree manufacturing and third-degree drug possession for the dried marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms New Jersey State Police seized at his rented home on Aug. 18, 2008.
Testimony in the case started Tuesday before Superior Court Judge Robert Reed, and attorneys delivered closing arguments this morning. The jury deliberated just before lunch and came to a decision about 4 p.m. Eastern time today.
1 746 747 748 749 750 759