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aug152017_cory_gardner_townhall_marshall_8_of_37_Brandon Marshall

On December 17, Senator Cory Gardner introduced an amendment to a federal prison reform bill that would protect a state’s right to legalize marijuana and determine how to regulate it within its borders.

Republican Gardner first helped introduce the legislation as its own bill, in a bipartisan effort with Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren known as the States Act. Despite gaining considerable attention over the summer, including an expression of support from President Donald Trump, the bill gained only ten co-sponsors after its introduction in June.

420 gamesBrandon Marshall

Civilized Worldwide Inc. announced its plans to acquire the 420 Games, expanding the reach of the Canada-based cannabis media company into Denver, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh and anywhere else the event is held in the future.

“We’re thrilled to be expanding the 420 Games across North America, and we are looking forward to introducing the Games to Canadians in 2019,” says Civilized publisher Derek Riedle.

jeff.sessions.shutterstock (1)Shutterstock.com/mark reinstein

The forced resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions may have much larger implications for where Robert Mueller’s investigation into President Donald Trump is heading, but ousting ol’ Jeffy was a score for the marijuana industry.

Sessions has a long history of hating the plant, and the hits kept coming during his short time as AG. In the ’80s, he’d said that he thought members of the Ku Klux Klan “were okay until I found out they smoked pot.” That didn’t stop Trump from appointing Sessions to AG in 2017, however, and that’s when the real madness began.

tetra_lounge_glitter_bong_collins20181Jacqueline Collins

Denver’s struggles with regulating social marijuana use have been well documented, but this city isn’t alone in facing such challenges. According to representatives from Alaska and Oregon, cities such as Portland and Anchorage are in the same boat.

During Denver’s annual Marijuana Management Symposium, a three-day conference about pot policy that returned October 31 through November 2, public officials from around the globe gathered in the Mile High City to discuss legal marijuana and its impacts. On top of roundtable chats about business regulations, law enforcement and public-health concerns, the conference offered a ninety-minute discussion about social marijuana use.

hemperor.glass.bottleNew Belgium Brewing

Craft brewers are known for their collaborative spirit. But that’s within the walls of the beer world. When it comes to other vices — like wine, spirits and cannabis — some industry leaders have been a bit standoffish.

Boston Beer Company, the biggest “craft brewery” in the country, for instance, warned in early 2016 that marijuana legalization could hurt breweries if people spent their dollars there, and the Brewers Association has been so uncomfortable around the subject that the industry trade group has barely mentioned it in past years — though it did offer some analysis of that competition in early 2017.

horseback.riding.thinkstock.800Thinkstock

A lawsuit filed by two Colorado landowners who claim that a nearby marijuana grow has reduced their property values in part because the smell makes horseback riding less pleasant goes to trial in Denver federal court today. And the repercussions of the suit’s strategy, based on federal racketeering laws, could have far-reaching effects on the cannabis industry in Colorado and beyond.

The case was filed in February 2015 by Safe Streets Alliance, a national anti-pot group, on behalf of two members, Phillis Windy Hope Reilly and Michael P. Reilly. Early on, the effort didn’t seem particularly professional: Note that the organization misspelled marijuana as “marajuana” in its initial press release on the subject. But SSA’s success in court over the past three years-plus has overcome this gaffe.

the_green_solution_collins20171215_003 (1)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado’s cannabis industry is still changing at a rapid pace. The industry’s watchdog, the state Marijuana Enforcement Division, updates its rules and regulations every year in hopes of catching up with the expanding field, which is growing like a weed in more ways than one.

The MED’s annual meetings aren’t unique to cannabis; plenty of regulatory agencies update their rules each year. But governing a federally illegal industry that is continually developing new methods for ingestion, packaging and product extraction takes a lot of work. That’s why the MED held six stakeholder meetings over the summer and into the fall, with public health and regulatory officials, industry members, law enforcement representatives and other individuals that make up Colorado’s legal cannabis picture.

buschCourtesy of ABV Cannabis Co.

When Adolphus A. Busch V, the great-great-grandson of Eberhard Adolphus Anheuser Busch, announced the launch of his Colorado-based cannabis brand on October 10, there were plenty of easy assumptions to make about big alcohol’s infiltration of legal weed. But the Colorado State University graduate says Budweiser and its parent company, Anheuser-Busch InBev, have nothing to do with his new venture, ABV Cannabis Co.

According to the Adolphus V, he started his company thanks to a “small investment” from his father, Adolphus Busch IV (the last Busch to control Anheuser-Busch), and that came after several years of grinding through the the beginning of Colorado’s recreational pot industry. Now he’s selling CO2-extracted hash pens across Colorado, with plans to expand into flower sales and jump into other states soon. To learn more about his background and plans in pot, Westword caught up with the young Busch

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