Browsing: Follow that story

mason_jar_spring_dabbing-collins-2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

A recent report from a Colorado organization devoted to keeping children away from marijuana advocates for potency limits on cannabis products, which continue to get stronger and stronger.

“This is very different from marijuana in the 1980s,” says Rachel O’Bryan, co-founder of Smart Colorado, whose mission statement notes that the outfit “engages and informs Coloradans on the risks that marijuana poses to youth.” As a result, she maintains, “it’s a fundamentally different game.”

captiol-marshall2015 (1)Brandon Marshall

The City of Denver’s marijuana conviction expungement program is online and ready to roll, according to the mayor’s office as well as the district and city attorneys, who collectively announced the news today, January 9.

Dubbed “Turn Over a New Leaf,” the campaign took a year and multiple city departments to implement and aims to dismiss and expunge thousands of convictions for marijuana crimes that are no longer illegal as of 2012, when Coloradans approved recreational marijuana.

hemp-field-campout-2018-lirette (1)Danielle Lirette

Hemp is where it’s at right now, especially in Colorado. Legal cannabis is cool and all — and we welcome Michigan and Vermont to the recreational party in 2019 — but that’s so 2015 in this state.

More about substance than style, industrial hemp’s many uses were finally recognized by the federal government in December, when President Donald Trump officially legalized it by signing the 2018 Farm Bill. Now that the plant is out from under the shadow of the Controlled Substances Act, it’s regulated by the Department of Agriculture and legal to farm in all fifty states.

mason_jar_spring_dabbing-collins-2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

A collective effort by several marijuana business groups could help bring social pot use to Colorado dispensaries, hotels, music venues and dozens of other types of businesses — if the concept makes it through the state legislature.

Marijuana industry lobbyists, tourism companies, lounge owners and dispensary representatives are planning to submit a marijuana hospitality bill to lawmakers that will propose creating two new business licenses that would allow social marijuana use in a manner similar to alcohol use.

first.legal.recreational.marijuana.sale.coloradoBrandon Marshall

January 1 will forever be a day of celebration in Colorado, where recreational cannabis sales began on January 1, 2014. When 2019 begins, Colorado will mark five years of such sales, with an expected $6 billion collected during that span.

If anyone qualifies to be on the guest list of an anniversary celebration, it’s Sean Azzariti. The Marine Corps veteran, cannabis activist and medical marijuana patient consultant wasn’t just present during the first legal cannabis sale in Colorado: He made the purchase. With plenty of cameras and onlookers present, Azzariti bought an eighth of Bubba Kush and some infused chocolate truffles for $59.74 from Toni Savage Fox, then-owner of 3D Cannabis Center at 4305 Brighton Boulevard. All that attention would make anyone nervous, but for Azzariti, who uses cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder after his time in the military, it was much more than a photo opportunity. It was a first step into national acceptance for his medicine of choice.

hemp.ben.droz.4Ben Droz

The moment the hemp industry has been waiting for finally happened: President Donald Trump just signed the 2018 Farm Bill, legalizing industrial hemp in the United States.

Although highly anticipated after congressional approval last week, full-scale hemp legalization wasn’t official until Trump signed the Farm Bill, a set of agricultural policies voted on every five years or so. Spurred by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the 2018 bill’s hemp provisions catapult the plant’s farming opportunities from state pilot programs to a nationwide scale by removing hemp from the Controlled Substances Act and treating it like an agricultural product.

smoking.driving.file.photo.800Thinkstock file photo

A retired Oregon police officer believes he’s found a way to detect marijuana impairment among drivers, and it starts by looking deep into their eyes.

The struggles behind effectively identifying stoned drivers have only grown for law enforcement as marijuana legalization spreads across the country. Detecting pot impairment isn’t as simple as using a breathalyzer, blood test or urine sample, as THC can affect everyone differently at varied paces. But law enforcement consultant Chuck Hayes (not the 6’5″ power forward who couldn’t shoot free throws) believes eye movement can help police officers get a better grip on stoned drivers.

aug152017_cory_gardner_townhall_marshall_8_of_37_Brandon Marshall

On December 17, Senator Cory Gardner introduced an amendment to a federal prison reform bill that would protect a state’s right to legalize marijuana and determine how to regulate it within its borders.

Republican Gardner first helped introduce the legislation as its own bill, in a bipartisan effort with Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren known as the States Act. Despite gaining considerable attention over the summer, including an expression of support from President Donald Trump, the bill gained only ten co-sponsors after its introduction in June.

420 gamesBrandon Marshall

Civilized Worldwide Inc. announced its plans to acquire the 420 Games, expanding the reach of the Canada-based cannabis media company into Denver, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh and anywhere else the event is held in the future.

“We’re thrilled to be expanding the 420 Games across North America, and we are looking forward to introducing the Games to Canadians in 2019,” says Civilized publisher Derek Riedle.

1 2 3 4 5 36