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den_20151124_boulderwellnesscenter_boulder_slentz_01Scott Lentz

After over a year of free-falling, marijuana prices are on the rise in Colorado, according to the state Department of Revenue. But several marijuana producers say those prices could be even higher than the state estimates.

According to the latest DOR estimates, wholesale marijuana flower is currently about $1,000 per pound, increasing by 17.5 percent from July to September, with trim, flower and whole plant matter allocated for extraction all rising in cost, as well. However, wholesale marijuana growers and dispensary general managers are telling us that wholesale flower prices are actually closer or above $1,300, and have been steadily rising all year.

den_canna_20150726_mmjamerica_arapahoe_slentz_05Scott Lentz

As Colorado’s cannabis industry opens up to more investment opportunities and public funding through a new law that takes effect November 1, expect powerful players to enter the fray. A private company is already beating some of those public corporations to the punch, however, purchasing five well-known dispensaries in the metro area this year alone.

Lova, a new dispensary brand, now owns both of MMJ America’s dispensaries in Denver as well as Groundswell Cannabis Boutique, Northern Lights Cannabis Co. in Edgewater and Boulder’s Trill Alternatives (MMJ America in Boulder and Northern Lights in Denver will remain unaffected by the deal). Founded by Matthew Shifrin and Amanda Fox, Lova is funded by Australian billionaire Brett Blundy. We sat down with Shifrin and Fox, a University of Denver alum, to learn more about their plans for their new dispensaries.

420-2019-civic-center-collins (1)Jacqueline Collins

The United States surgeon general wants Americans, particularly teens, young adults and pregnant women, to put the brakes on cannabis.

At an August 29 announcement of a new health advisory about the rising popularity of pot use, Surgeon General Jerome Adams warned of the dangers of potent cannabis, overeating edibles and the plant’s effects on pregnant mothers, unborn children and the developing brains of young people.

veritas_farm_collins20190807_038 (1)Jacqueline Collins

The prospect for more federal marijuana research improved significantly today, August 26, when the Drug Enforcement Administration announced it would begin to “facilitate and expand scientific and medical research for marijuana in the United States.”

With only one marijuana cultivation designated for federally approved research purposes over the past fifty years — located at the University of Mississippi — proponents both for and against cannabis legalization have complained about the DEA’s lack of progress on significant research. Applications to grow marijuana for federal studies had been stalled for several years under Attorney General Jeff Sessions, and the agency was even sued by a researcher it had permitted to conduct cannabis research over the lack of quality marijuana to use for her studies.

the_green_solution_marijuana-grow-collins2017 (1)Jacqueline Collins

A group of Colorado researchers recently studied how cannabis use affects athletes and found a possible role between the plant and pain management.

The study, “Cannabis use in active athletes: Behaviors related to subjective effects,” looked at cannabis use patterns and its effects in a community-based sample of adult athletes. According to the study’s authors, there had been no previous academic research done on cannabis use’s subjective effects for adult athletes.

noco_hemp_expo_collins2018Jacqueline Collins

Happy National CBD Day, everyone. No, we’re not joking: National CBD Day is now a sort of official day on the calendar, according to the not very official National Day Calendar. But where did this day come from?

As with most “national days,” National CBD Day is rooted in commercial interests, indicating just how powerful the CBD industry, expected to hit upwards of $15 billion by 2025, has become in a short time.

binske-jake-pasternack-courtesy-2019Courtesy of Binske

Those brothers behind Binske are at it again. The Denver-based cannabis company has just announced a licensing agreement that will put the Binske brand in eleven states around the country.

According to an announcement from the company regarding its new partnership with MariMed, a publicly held cannabis investment firm based in Massachusetts, Binske will soon be available to over 52 million people aged 21 to 61 in states with medical and recreational marijuana.

sue.sisley.phoenix.new.times.largePhoenix New Times

Dr. Sue Sisley holds the rare distinction of being licensed by the Drug Enforcement Administration to study marijuana, so why is she suing the DEA over its marijuana research policies?

In a lawsuit filed in the United States Court of Appeals in June, Sisley claims that the DEA has created a monopoly around federally licensed marijuana research. By requiring that researchers only use marijuana from the University of Mississippi for their studies, she charges that federally licensed marijuana researchers are limited to low-grade cannabis without proper variety.

den_canna_20150717_colorado-harvest-register_slentz_05 (1)Scott Lentz

The push for federal cannabis banking legalization took another baby step on July 23 when the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs heard a bill that would allow financial institutions to serve companies connected with cannabis, which is still federally illegal.

Introduced by Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon, the SAFE Banking Act would protect banks and other financial outfits from federal charges if they provide accounts, loans and other services to pot businesses as well as ancillary enterprises that work with cannabis-focused enterprises, such as real estate agencies, accountants and other business vendors.

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