Browsing: Media

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Earlier this month, we told you about “Don’t Be a Lab Rat,” a new campaign aimed at dissuading teens from smoking pot. The multi-media effort, backed by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, includes oversized rat cages intended to be displayed in public places throughout the state.
Now, however, the City of Boulder and Boulder Valley Schools have rejected the displays, and that cheers one cannabis-industry representative, who calls the cages racist and thinks Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper should apologize for the campaign.

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Back at it again, with another clever and classy mainstream print advertisement in favor of medical marijuana use, cannabis super-site Leafly.com has teamed up with Americans for Safe Access (ASA) for an encore of Leafly’s last leap into the media spotlight.
You may remember, just over a week ago, when Leafly successfully placed and ran the first “consumer cannabis” advertisement ever to be published in the New York Times. We described the NYT spot as “tasteful and informative top to bottom”, and the gurus at Leafly seem to have followed the same formula this time around too.

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When it comes to marketing and advertising, proper timing is always essential – and you want to strike while the iron is hot. As cannabis use becomes more and more mainstream, the topic of marijuana legalization is finally being raised in all regions of the country.
When Colorado and Washington became the first states to make weed legal for adults for recreational purposes, the eyes of cannabis critics nationwide focused on the two battleground states, desperately waiting and hoping for problems to arise.

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www.leafly.com/ny


As advertising executives across the country pull what’s left of their hair out trying to sell enough adspace to keep main stream print media from completely going under, the one major money market that they have completely left untapped is medical marijuana. Until now, that is.
You may recall, it was just three short months ago when CBS pulled paid-for Weedmaps advertisements off of Times Square billboards just minutes before they were scheduled to be unveiled. But times, and opinions, are changing when it comes to weed, and now the New York Times has announced that it will run the publication’s first full page advertisement for what they refer to as the “consumer cannabis” market.

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The New York Times made huge headlines over the weekend when its editorial board called for the “national legalization” of marijuana. Pro-pot groups were crawling over each other so they could be among the first to offer the deepest, we-are-not-worthy bows to the newspaper of record in the United States. After all, who among them would disagree with the Times’ assertion that ” … the federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.”
But one Southern California-based medical-weed information service said, Hold on just a second: It turns out the paper, which said in its editorial that cannabis is “far less dangerous than alcohol,” still tests new employees for marijuana.
LA Weekly has the rest.

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Just when a corporate giant like the New York Times begins to restore your faith in the main stream media, along comes another Sunday episode of Meet The Press to leave you stopping in mid-toke to scream at your TV.
The channel cannot change fast enough when someone like John McCain is being asked, for some damn reason, for his opinion on foreign policy, yet not being asked how the hell he thought that bringing us Sarah Palin was a good idea. This week, however, the topic turned to pot, and guest panelist and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus gave us all a renewed hatred for out of touch journalists.

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Adam Hartle (left) with Tom Tancredo.


In January 2013, ex-Colorado Congressman Tom Tancredo had promised to puff a joint on camera as part of a comedian/filmmaker’s movie about Colorado’s new marijuana laws should the measure pass — which it did.
Tancredo later welched on his bet under pressure from his family. But in Mile High — The COmeback of Cannabis, the now-completed documentary, which screens tonight through Thursday (with Hartle promising to give out free legal pot to adults 21 and over outside theaters), Tancredo watches as the director blazes.

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More than 20 percent of all vets coming home from the Middle East report at least some symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. For some, it shows in depression and anxiety or an inability to function normally in day-to-day civilian life. For others, it’s more grave.
After two tours in Afghanistan, Matt Kahl says the only way out he saw after returning home was through suicide. He tried and failed, and likely would have tried again if it wasn’t for one thing: cannabis.

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The press used to be so well-respected in this country that they were referred to as “the fourth estate”. In February 1891, Oscar Wilde wrote, “Somebody — was it Burke? — called journalism the fourth estate. That was true at the time no doubt. But at the present moment it is the only estate. It has eaten up the other three…We are dominated by Journalism.”
Today, well over a century later, with the advent of 24-hour cable news stations, AM talk radio hero worship, and the internet, the media holds more power than ever.

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