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Photo: WAMM
Valerie Corral, WAMM’s co-founder: “We are heartened by the federal government’s newly declared position suggesting deference to state medical marijuana laws”

​Seven years after Drug Enforcement Administration agents raided a California medical marijuana farm, forcing patients out of bed at gunpoint, founders of the collective running the farm agreed to settle a lawsuit against the federal government.

The Wo/Men’s Alliance for Medical Marijuana (WAMM) will continue helping terminally and critically ill patients under the settlement.
Valerie and Mike Corral, founders of WAMM, called the settlement a “draw.” “They didn’t win; we didn’t win,” Mike Corral told the San Jose Mercury News.
“We hope that over time the federal government will recognize its senseless position on medical marijuana and will formally codify protections for the sick, dying and marginalized patients who have the right to use whatever substances their physicians recommend to ease suffering,” said Valerie Corral in a statement read before U.S. District Court Judge Jeremy Fogel.
“We are nonetheless heartened by the federal government’s newly declared position suggesting deference to state medical marijuana laws and we are extraordinarily proud of our collective’s role in effecting this change in policy,” Corral said. “However, should our government break their word and again pursue this senseless assault on the sick and dying, we stand at the ready and we promise to hold them accountable in a court of law.”

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Photo: Flash City

​Legendary actor Dennis Hopper, the Easy Rider himself, was photographed Thursday at The Farmacy Cannabis Club in Venice, California, a medical marijuana dispensary.

Hopper wore a checkered paperboy cap and dark-rimmed glasses into the establishment, which resembles a farmer’s market, according to “Doug” at RadarOnline.
Hopper’s filmography contains many high points in addition to the 1969 counterculture classic Easy Rider, which featured an iconic pot-smoking scene with Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson.

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Photo: www.greenroofs.com
Believe it or not, you can grow stuff besides pot using hydroponic systems. But don’t try to tell that to the Finnish police.

​There was no marijuana discovered at the place. But a Finnish garden supply store has been raided by local police who claimed the operation is “deliberately promoting” the purchase and use of home cultivation supplies for growing cannabis.

According to Finnish legal experts, the cops are breaking new ground in trying to link hydroponic gardening equipment with illegal cultivation of marijuana. The question of whether merely selling hydroponic equipment is equal to “drug promotion” has no precedent in Finnish law, reports A. Rienstra at IceNews.
“The police are testing the boundaries,” said Matti Tolvanen, professor of criminal and procedural law at the University of Eastern Finland. “After all, selling knives is not illegal, even though they are used to commit homicides.”

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Photo: www.blacktie-colorado.com
In better days: Reuben Droughns and a friend at a party in 2004

​In 2004, he rushed for more than a thousand yards as running back with the Denver Broncos. Now he could be going to jail for growing marijuana.

Reuben Droughns is “under investigation” by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration for growing pot in his Centennial, Colorado home, reports Julie Hayden of KDVR Denver.
According to KDVR, Droughns is raising the medical marijuana defense, but the DEA, which under federal law doesn’t recognize the medical use of pot, is having none of it.
Agents reportedly found an indoor marijuana grow operation in the spare bedrooms of the former NFL star’s home.
Droughns reportedly didn’t show investigators a medical marijuana card, but his mother and brother did.

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Photo: Jamie Scott Lytle/North County Times
Mother Earth’s Alternative Healing Cooperative founders Brenda Perez and Bob Riedel at the dispensary, which may be featured on an upcoming reality series

​Mother Earth’s Alternative Healing Cooperative, a medical marijuana dispensary in the San Diego suburb of Fallbrook, may be featured in an upcoming reality TV series about California’s cannabis culture.

Two Los Angeles television producers were in town Wednesday to film interviews at the dispensary for a pilot episode they plan to pitch to Showtime, Bravo, Lifetime and other networks, reports Morgan Cook of the North County Times.
The show, which may be titled “Grass Roots,” will explore California’s burgeoning pot culture, from growers in Northern California to the dispensaries which sell marijuana to patients statewide.

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Photo: Beverly Hills NORML

​​The California Marijuana Report™, a cutting edge report for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws featuring California cannabis news, music and culture, has joined forces with Beverly Hills NORML.

“The CMR will broadcast from the elegant and well-connected NORML 90210,” said host Eric Brenner. “We are thrilled to be joining forces with such visionaries as Cheryl Shuman and Fred Rhoades, who share my passion to legalize marijuana.”

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Graphic: www.seekcodes.com

​Dude… This story’s probably gonna make you feel better about yourself, because you are so much more together than the idiot in Flagstaff, Arizona, who busted into a head shop and stole $300 worth of fake weed Monday night.

In the police blotter of Wednesday’s Arizona Daily Sun is a report of a burglary at the Kind Connection Tattoo and Smoke Shop (I’ve never been there and I already love the place), where the burglar only stole two items: a $200 incense vaporizer and $300 worth of fake pot.
The burglar bashed in the front window with a baseball bat — setting off, of course, the store’s alarm system — went in, selected the two items, and left, reports James King at Phoenix New Times.

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Encycloweedia works with all iPhones and iPod Touches running version 2.0 software or later.

​A Dallas architecture company found business to be a little too slow for their liking. Unlike many others, they did something creative — and lucrative — about it. They created “Encycloweedia,” an iPhone app that serves as a one-stop resource for potheads.

Since Hub City Productions released the application in November, it’s been one of the top 20 reference apps on Apple’s site, reports Patrick Williams at the Dallas Observer.
The $1.99 app is being downloaded about 200 times a day, according to Hub City’s Robert Romano. “It’s blowing our minds,” Romano said. “It’s crazy.”
Romano said there’s a serious side to Encycloweedia: Countless seriously ill people — not necessarily recreational smokers — who don’t know much about marijuana and its effects need an easy-to-find source of good information.
“The head shops and dispensaries are just full of attitude,” Romano said. The app, according to Romano, “is like Pot Smoking For Dummies.”
Among example of useful information provided by Encycloweedia are marijuana recipes. Pot-naive patients might be too ill to smoke, but might have no idea how to cook with the herb.


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Graphic: thefreshscent.com

​If you’re a legal medical marijuana patient in Washington and you thought your doctor’s recommendation protected you from search or arrest, you’re wrong. According to a new court ruling, you can be arrested and hauled into court every time an officer smells pot at your home — even if you are complying with the law.

In a sharply divided decision, the Washington Supreme Court Thursday ruled against a patient arrested for possessing marijuana — despite the fact that the patient had a doctor’s recommendation for medicinal pot.

Incredibly, the court found that police had probable cause to search the patient’s home, even after he presented what both he and the police believed to be a valid medical marijuana authorization form under Washington’s medical marijuana law.

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Photo: puffpuffere, forum.grasscity.com
Imagine the concept: You and your doctor, rather than the Legislature, deciding how much medicine you need.

​The California Supreme Court has struck down limits on how much medical marijuana patients can possess and cultivate.

Patients and caregivers with a doctor’s recommendation to use marijuana can now possess as much as is “reasonably related to the patient’s current medical needs,” a standard that the court established in a 1997 decision.
The court concluded that the restrictions imposed by the Legislature are an unconstitutional amendment of a 1996 voter-approved initiative.
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